** THEME **

703 / Reblog

spicyshimmy:

the first person to make it out of the inquisition character creator and actually start playing the game is stronger than the rest of us and should be respected as such



1200 / Reblog

813 / Reblog
"Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

That’s thin privilege."
-

Let’s Talk About Thin Privilege — Everyday Feminism (via samanticshift)

You ain’t got people legitimately denying you job and educational opportunities because of the fact that you are thin.

You will not have people taking your picture in disgust and have them use it as ‘motivation’ to not be like you.

You are represented in all forms of media in an overwhelmingly POSITIVE light.

Plain and simple. There is no place in this world where thin people are not put up as the ideal.

So can we stop acting as if someone being individually teased for being skinny is the same as the systematic way that fat people are told their bodies are always wrong because morality?

(via eshusplayground)

(via strawberreli)




39493 / Reblog

121489 / Reblog
bitch-media:

From Amy Lam’s article "Nicki Minaj’s Unapologetic Sexuality is Not a Crisis": 
When Minaj received negative feedback after releasing the cover art for “Anaconda,” she took to her Instagram to highlight the inconsistent and—let’s be honest—racist reactions to her displaying her own body. She wrote“Angelic. Acceptable. Lol” alongside photos of white Sports Illustrated models, topless and arching their backs, with their barely-covered bottoms on the cover of the magazine.
When Lady Gaga uses her body as a form of expression, she’s an “artist.” When Nicki Minaj owns her own hypersexuality, she’s slut-shamed.  
Where was the outcry against Katy Perry’s “California Gurls” when she laid about nude on a puffy pink cloud, with a small piece of fluff covering her bum? Did folks call Miley Cyrus’s “Wrecking Ball” a piece of pornography when she salaciously licked a sledgehammer and writhed around naked on an actual wrecking ball? Did Jennifer Aniston face disparaging criticism for her strip scenes in last year’s We’re The Millers? Nope, they asked her how she got in shape for the role.  
Continue reading on BitchMedia.org. 

2689 / Reblog
sincerelyhappines:

(via TumbleOn)

4768 / Reblog

2226 / Reblog

1088 / Reblog
stellarleuna:

'FATALE'8.3 x 11.7in
SOLD 
This is one of my favourite pieces which is why it’s all over everything.